Sunday, April 28, 2013

BMW driver sought in road rage attack - know anyone with Beemer!? 1-877-700-BAIL (2245)

Beverly Hills police ask for aid in tracking down the motorist who 'intentionally rammed' his car into a bicyclist, pinning him against a trash bin. 

 

The driver is described as a white or Middle Eastern male in his mid-30s with dark hair, dark eyes and a thin build, police said. "The driver intentionally rammed the bicyclist with his vehicle, pinning him to a metal rolling trash bin," the Beverly Hills Police Department said in a statement. The driver fled the scene, in an alley off Wilshire Boulevard between Wetherly and Almont drives. The bicyclist, whom police have not identified, told investigators that the incident was sparked by a fight he had earlier with the driver, according to police. "The bicyclist punched the driver in the face," police said, adding that the driver then "threatened to kill the victim and followed him" into the alley. The cyclist was taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Anyone with information is asked to call Det. Eric Hyon at (310) 285-2156.

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Thursday, April 25, 2013

Man arrested in fatal Escondido shooting - BailNowSanDiegoCounty.com ph# 619-224-0064


 — A man was fatally shot outside a house in Escondido and another man was arrested Wednesday night.
Police responded about 8:30 p.m. to a report of shots fired on McDonald Lane, near Alexander Drive.
photo
Brandon Sanchez / photo courtesy Angelique Sanchez
When officers arrived they found a man suffering from a single gunshot wound lying outside a trailer, Escondido police Lt. Neal Griffin said.
Family members at the scene identified him as Brandon Sanchez, 36. Sanchez had been shot in the chest, Griffen said.
Officers questioned several people and later took 55-year-old Michael Hemphill into custody. He was booked into Vista jail on a murder charge.
The shooting apparently followed some type of altercation, the lieutenant said.
It was the first homicide of the year in Escondido, police Capt. Mike Loarie said.

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Monday, April 22, 2013

Even drunk drivers have rights - We agree! - Call BailNow TODAY 1-877-700-BAIL (2245)

The Supreme Court was correct in ruling that the 4th Amendment applies in DUI cases. 

Sobriety test

Drunk driving is a public menace, and the nation is better for efforts to crack down on it. But motorists arrested for driving under the influence, like other people accused of crimes, have constitutional rights that police must respect — including the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures.
The Supreme Court reaffirmed that principle last week when it refused to give police blanket authority to draw blood from suspected drunk drivers without first obtaining a search warrant based on probable cause. Police in California and elsewhere are now on notice that, except in truly exigent circumstances, a warrant is necessary.
In a 1966 ruling, the court had upheld the taking of blood evidence without a warrant because the police officer in that case might reasonably have believed that the evidence of intoxication would have dissipated by the time he could obtain one. In the case decided last week, the state of Missouri had asked the court to establish a flat rule that warrants are unnecessary because of the danger that blood evidence would degrade.
By an 8-1 vote, the justices refused to carve out such a broad exception. In the leading opinion, Justice Sonia Sotomayor said that the legality of warrantless blood drawings should be evaluated based on "the totality of the circumstances." In a concurring opinion, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. proposed a more detailed test: A warrant is unnecessary when "there is a compelling need to prevent the imminent destruction of important evidence, and there is no time to obtain a warrant." The "totality of the circumstances" test may not be crystal clear, but the practical effect of this decision will be to encourage police to seek warrants and to press magistrates to be available to provide them in a timely and efficient way. Sotomayor noted that a majority of states already allow police and prosecutors to apply for warrants electronically or by radio or telephone.
The warrant requirement is a valuable safeguard even though most applications will be approved. As Justice Stephen G. Breyer pointed out during oral arguments in the case, the requirement that an officer seek permission from a magistrate to draw blood means that "you have a second judgment and the officer has to talk to somebody, so he's a little more careful."
On Friday, the California Highway Patrol said it would be suspending non-consensual testing in misdemeanor impaired-driving cases and would obtain search warrants in felony DUI cases "unless there is an existence of exigent circumstance beyond the mere dissipation of the suspect's blood alcohol content."
Motorists who fail a breath or blood test or refuse to undergo one lose their driver's licenses. But drunk driving also can lead to criminal penalties — serious ones in cases in which there are deaths or injuries. As in any criminal investigation, police searching for evidence of drunk driving must follow the 4th Amendment.

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Thursday, April 18, 2013

Pakistani court rejects Musharraf's bail - Bail Bonds Pakistani style! 1-877-700-BAIL (2245)


BailNow won't send you into excile!

The order is legally binding, said Nizami, who is acting as a spokesman for the government.
The government must act within 24 hours of the high court decision or face contempt of court charges. It appears ready to comply with the order.
This means Musharraf could be placed under house arrest at his villa as soon as Thursday evening.
Local TV stations earlier showed police entering his villa compound, where Musharraf went after being quickly ushered from the court by his private security detail.
The arrest order was made at the same time as the court rejected Musharraf's request for a bail extension in a case he is facing over the detention of judges in 2007.
The ruling set the stage for his arrest and has further undermined his political ambitions.
Musharraf's office called the Islamabad court's decision "unwarranted judicial activism" that was "seemingly motivated by personal vendettas," and said it would appeal against it at the Supreme Court.
But Ibrahim Satti, one of Musharraf's attorneys, told local TV reporters that they had arrived at the court too late in the day and that the Supreme Court refused to accept the appeal.
Satti said Musharraf's legal team would seek to file the appeal Friday instead, local TV stations reported.
Meanwhile, the Islamabad High Court issued a ruling calling the inspector general of Islamabad police to court Friday to explain why his officers did not arrest Musharraf in court Thursday as instructed.
The high court ruling asks the inspector what precise steps police took to arrest Musharraf.
The ruling also says that when Musharraf allegedly ordered the house arrest of senior judges in 2007, it was an "act of terrorism" to prevent the judges from doing their job.
Return from exile
Musharraf resigned as president of the South Asian nation five years ago and went into exile in London and Dubai. He returned to Pakistan under heavy security to contest three court cases against him and run in upcoming elections.
But so far, his return does not seem to be going according to plan.
This week, Pakistani election officials barred Musharraf from running for a seat in parliament, a decision his lawyer has said he will challenge in the Supreme Court.
That decision appears to have emboldened members of the judiciary, many of whom have bitter memories of their treatment by Musharraf during his time in power.
The rejection of bail Thursday came in a case in which Musharraf faces accusations that he illegally imposed house arrest on senior judges during a period of emergency rule he imposed six years ago.
It wasn't immediately clear how the high court's ruling would play out.

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Tuesday, April 16, 2013

L.A. authorities boost security at key sites - Good! - You'll be safe at BailNowLA! 1-877-700-BAIL (2245)


Law enforcement agencies take extra precautions at LAX, Dodger Stadium and other places where crowds congregate.

Authorities in Southern California went on a heightened state of alert after Monday's Boston Marathon bombing, beefing up security at Los Angeles International AirportDodger Stadium and other venues where crowds congregate.
Law enforcement officials said they took the steps to reassure the public while guarding against the possibility of potential attacks related to or inspired by the Boston bombings that left at least three dead and dozens injured.
LAX, the target of the failed 1999 millennium bomb plot, immediately stepped up police patrols and employed additional bomb-sniffing dogs in and around terminals and parking areas.

"While there is no information to suggest that there is any nexus to the Los Angeles area, in an abundance of caution, Airport Police has increased its presence at LAX, LA/Ontario International and Van Nuys airports by deploying bomb-detection canines, additional patrol officers and security personnel," L.A. World Airports said in a statement.
Police focused their attention on protecting key infrastructure, sites where crowds gather or places of cultural or iconic significance, and urged the public to immediately report suspicious activity.
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said in a statement: "We are working closely with our law enforcement partners to monitor the situation and stand ready to aid Boston in any way possible. The LAPD and other public safety agencies will remain vigilant at all public and sporting events in Los Angeles."
To that end Police Chief Charlie Beck said Monday that his department will increase officer deployments at sporting events, beginning with the Dodgers-San Diego Padresbaseball game Monday evening.
The LAPD had planned to increase the number of officers at the Dodgers-Padres game anyway, expecting it would draw more people after a brawl last week in San Diego left Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke injured. But the events in Boston led officials to also deploy bomb-squad personnel, dogs and other "precautions geared to preventing a similar event," Beck said.
Also stepping up security is this weekend's Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, which each year draws more than 170,000 spectators for racing Friday through Sunday.
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said it too would have higher visibility.
"While the cause of the explosions this morning at the Boston Marathon are still under investigation, our vigilance has been raised," said Sheriff Lee Baca, noting that the bombing hit home for him as a law enforcement leader and as a long-distance runner.
While his deputies increased patrols in areas that attract crowds, including "government buildings, shopping centers, athletic events and public transit," Baca said such acts must not cut into the budget.

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Saturday, April 13, 2013

O.C. man sentenced to 5 years for killing doctor in hit-and-run - BailNowOrangeCounty.com 1-877-700-BAIL (2245)


Craziness in The OC!-
An Orange County man was convicted and sentenced Friday to five years in state prison for killing a doctor who was riding her bicycle in Newport Beach and then fleeing the scene, prosecutors said.
Michael Jason Lopez, 40, pleaded guilty to a court offer of one felony count of hit-and-run causing death and a misdemeanor count of vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence, according to a statement from the Orange County district attorney's office. A previous conviction of residential burglary in 1993 was considered during the sentence, prosecutors said.
Prosecutors said that on the morning of Sept. 15, Lopez was driving his Toyota pickup on Newport Coast Drive when it struck Dr. Catherine Campion-Ritz, 57, as she rode her bicycle with her husband. He hit her from behind, throwing her onto the street.
Prosecutors said Lopez fled, rather than calling 911 or attempting to render aid.
Campion-Ritz was taken to a hospital, where she died hours after the accident.
Prosecutors said that Newport Beach police were able to identify Lopez's truck through surveillance video, which allowed them to determine his license plate number and that Lopez was driving. He was arrested days later.
"Catherine was many things to many people: physician and leader in the medical community, business leader, church rector and family leader. To me she was my wife," her husband said in a victim impact statement submitted to the court.
"She was my confidant, my partner in adventure, and my inspiration. There is an emptiness at home with no one to reminisce about [the] past, to discuss the day's events or to make plans for the future. The activities we did together I typically now do alone or not at all."
Several of her family members, including her siblings and her mother, also submitted statements, saying what her absence has meant for the family.
"I never expected to outlive my children," her mother said, "yet Kit is gone at 57 and I am still here at 87."

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Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Man arrested in connection with slaying of San Bernardino woman - at least we don't have to deal with this creep anymore! - BailNowSanBernadinoCounty.com

A handyman is arrested on suspicion of killing a San Bernardino woman in November, an attack police believe is linked to the slayings of 2 other elderly women.

The investigation into the slayings of three women in San Bernardino, all elderly and attacked while alone in their homes, caught its first major break, police said Monday.
A neighborhood handyman was arrested in connection with the violent, home-invasion slaying of Mary Beth Blaskey, 76, in November, San Bernardino Police Chief Rob Handy announced at a news conference. The violence and seeming randomness of the killing was unnerving even in a city calloused by an uptick in gang-related violent crime.
"This type of predator, this type of victim, this type of crime concerns us greatly,'' Handy said. "We're not done. We're far from done. We believe he may be linked to other crimes in the city.''
Jerome Anthony Rogers, a 58-year-old registered sex offender, was arrested Friday on suspicion of killing Blaskey on Nov. 14. Blaskey's son found his mother dead, and her home ransacked, when he dropped by to take her to a doctor's appointment.
Handy said DNA found at the murder scene matched a sample from Rogers, who was among 30 suspects being investigated for the killings. Handy stopped short of saying Rogers was a suspect in the other two slayings, but acknowledged that investigators believe the killings, given their similarities, are linked.
Handy said detectives also believe additional suspects may have been involved in the attacks, and from the outset were focused on "burglary crews" because the killings occurred during brazen, daytime home invasions.
All three slain women lived in the quiet, northern neighborhoods of the city; two were members of the First Presbyterian Church on D Street.
Wanda Paulin, 86, was killed in December 2010, and Josephine Kelley, 90, was killed in September 2005. At least one of the victims was sexually assaulted. Handy declined to provide additional details because the investigation is ongoing.
Handy said Rogers worked as a handyman in that part of the city, walking door to door and offering to do odd jobs. Rogers was a transient who bounced among the homes of relatives and friends, Handy said.
On Friday, San Bernardino investigators received notice that DNA recovered at Blaskey's house matched the DNA profile of Rogers, which had been entered into the state Department of Justice DNA database because of his sexual assault conviction. Rogers is listed as a registered sex offender in the state's Megan's Law database for sodomizing a child under 14 years old.
Rogers denied being involved in any of the crimes, Handy said. San Bernardino detectives executed search warrants on four homes Rogers was known to frequent and recovered property belonging to Blaskey at at least one location, Handy said.
San Bernardino Mayor Patrick Morris called the slayings "tragic in the extreme," and urged residents to call in any tips that might help with the investigation. The city has offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to an arrest and conviction in each case.
Relatives of all three victims attended Monday's news conference, saying they were encouraged that progress has been made in the cases.
"We're still hoping that our case will be solved, but it's encouraging that one of the cases was brought forward like this,'' said Phillip Kelley, the son of Josephine Kelley. "I was kind of losing hope before this. It didn't seem like anything was getting done.''
Sherman Ballard, Paulin's son-in-law, said the family remains devastated by the killing.
"She was the little old lady who took other little old ladies to their doctors' appointments.… She was a very vibrant 86-year-old woman," Ballard said, visibly shaken. "She was a wonderful grandmother to my children.''

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Saturday, April 6, 2013

Prison audit finds workers' misconduct with inmates - BailNow keeps you OUT of jail so this won't happen to YOU!


The 278 disciplinary cases occurring over six months involve smuggling contraband, sex with prisoners and ignoring or arranging assaults.
SACRAMENTO — A catalog of recent misconduct cases in California's corrections system includes allegations that prison guards groped and grappled with inmates, brought them drugs, shared their booze and solicited them for sex.
The two-volume report, issued this week by the independent Office of Inspector General, chronicles 278 disciplinary cases the watchdog agency monitored from July to December 2012.
The report includes numerous allegations of prison workers delivering drugs and mobile phones to inmates, having sex with them and turning a blind eye to or even arranging inmate assaults. Some cases were dismissed or handled administratively; others were turned over to county prosecutors.
In one alleged coverup involving seven prison officials, a guard accepted an inmate's challenge to a fistfight, stripped off his prison gear and began a fight that was ultimately broken up by another guard's baton, the report says. Afterward, the guard allegedly staged an assault by the inmate to "fabricate a legitimate reason for the injuries he suffered earlier."
The guard was charged with six felony counts. He pleaded no contest to reduced misdemeanor charges. He and three other officers lost their jobs over the incident and two other prison officials took pay cuts.
The inspector general's report includes four alleged cases of corrections officers ordering assaults on inmates, including a parole agent accused of soliciting a parolee to murder another parolee. That April 2012 incident remains under investigation.
In other cases, the independent reviewers criticize the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation for long delays in investigating alleged misconduct. Internal investigators took nearly a year to file a report on a security chief — accused of sexual relations with inmates in a juvenile facility — while he was allowed him to remain on paid leave.
The office of inspector general, however, praised the corrections department for improving its reporting of discipline cases. But it said gains still need to be made in the southern part of the state, where the handling of nearly a third of all disciplinary reports was still deemed "insufficient."
The twice yearly reports by the inspector general are the offshoot of court cases against the corrections department involving use of force and the care of inmates.
The public airing of internal investigations, whose files remain confidential, is part of what department spokeswoman Terry Thornton called "the most transparent employee investigation and disciplinary process in the nation." She said it reflects a "model internal affairs investigation and employee disciplinary process that is fair, consistent and transparent."
She also said the vast majority of the corrections department's "more than 46,000 employees are hard-working and professional."

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